Vera: A Tale of Pelythia by J. A. Knight

Published: 24th June 2018Goodreads badge
Publisher:
 Independently published
Pages: 54
Format: Book 
Genre:
 Fantasy
★   ★   ★   ★  – 4 Stars

The time has come for Vera to complete her Ceremony, a coming-of-age tradition of the mountain people of Torsti. To claim her place as an adult of her village, she must use her wits to survive a week of isolation in the wilderness of the mountain.

I was loaned a copy of this book and I was pleasantly surprised. This easily stands alone as a short story, there is impressive world building and character development and with a few lines and few words Knight can convey meaning and intent. I understood who Vera was, what she wanted to achieve and why, and I understood the villagers and their opinion.

This is also a wonderful introduction to a bigger, longer series if that’s where Knight is headed. There is space to grow and the events after Vera’s journey to unfold. The ending leaves you with questions and curiosity and while it’s impactful on its own, there’s a temptation to find the answers and further the story.

Vera’s a character who is young but isn’t looking for pity. Her own coming-of-age journey is one she ventures into with pride and determination. Her youth and naivety is evident but so is her strength and intellect. Knight brings her to life with her vulnerabilities, jealousy, and her insecurities that are relatable even for this fantasy world.

While I wasn’t expecting to hate it, I was impressed at how much I enjoyed reading this short story. I look forward to reading more about Vera and Pelythia if that is on the cards. Knight has the beginnings of a well thought out and creative world, not to mention strong and relatable characters like Vera.

You can purchase Vera: A Tale of Pelythia via the following

Amazon | Amazon Aust

Book Bingo 2019

I love participating in Book Bingo, even if I keep forgetting sometimes. I love challenging myself to read a wide variety of books and styles. I could happily spend the year just reading YA and picture books (I probably will also do that), but this gives me a chance to discover so many new and wonderful authors and content.

For 2019 I’m looking at reading a variety of stories, voices, and genres I don’t explore that often. A lot of my choices are new or recent additions but there a few favourites because there are so many books out there I want to read I need to have a few reoccurring squares. I finally picked my last few squares so now I can start crossing them off. I don’t know if I will do a full card this year, but I will try for as many lines completed as I can.

Are you going to participate in a Book Bingo this year? As in previous years, you are more than welcome to borrow my card for your own Book Bingo, just remember to link to my page and attribute me properly. If you don’t want to use this one, follow my Book Bingo tag to find previous cards to use.

 

Mr Gumpy’s Outing by John Burningham

Published: 15th March 1990Goodreads badge
Publisher: 
Square Fish
Illustrator: John Burningham
Pages: 32
Format: Paperback Picture Book
★   ★   ★   ★   ★  – 5 Star

Mr. Gumpy lives by a river. One sunny day he decides to take a ride in his small boat.

It is such a perfect idea, for such a perfect summer day, that he soon has company: first the children, then the rabbit, the cat, the dog, the pig, the sheep, the chickens, and still others until– Mr. Gumpy’s outing comes to an inevitable but not unhappy, conclusion.

“Come for a ride another day,” says Mr. Gumpy at the book’s end. And young readers will return again and again to this sprightly story with its clever, captivating illustrations that reflect the sunlit quality of a lazy summer afternoon.

A classic story of Burningham’s that remains popular and everlasting. Mr Gumpy plans to go on a boat trip and soon all those nearby want to come along as well: if they all behave themselves.

Gumpy’s own good nature gets him in to trouble as one should never work with children and animals, their instincts and nature failing to be held back for a quick boating trip. While there are antics and warnings, Gumpy is a good soul and has no hard feelings for the companion’s behaviour.

There is tension and suspense as you worry how much more this boat can take, will these occupants behave themselves? Will the boat be able to stay afloat? I really enjoyed this story, it’s simple but filled with substance and has a nice bit of adventure and friendship.

The illustrations are a wonderful accompaniment to the story, working together to tell the story Burningham wanted to tell. The pictures are uniquely Burningham’s style of fine line and recognisable, uncomplicated designs which are a combination of simplicity and wonderful detail.

The ending is heartwarming and you can really see why this story has lasted and why it’s beloved by so many.

You can purchase Mr Gumpy’s Outing via the following

QBD | Booktopia | Book Depository

Dymocks | WorderyAngus and Robinson

 Fishpond | Amazon Aust | Amazon

Mrs Frisby and the Rats of NIMH (#1) by Robert C. O’Brien

Long Lost Reviews is a monthly meme created by Ally over at Ally’s Appraisals which is posted on the second Thursday of every month. The aim is to start tackling your review backlog. Whether it’s an in-depth analysis of how it affected your life, one sentence stating that you only remember the ending, or that you have no recollection of reading the book at all. 

Todays LLR is one I actually found in my drafts from the long ago time of 2013. It’s a short, strange review but it’s a decent start because I remember very little about the book without it. It’s so strange reading this now because I would not have written this review like this now, but that’s what 5 years of practice will do. I don’t say much in this review in terms of specifics but I seemed to quite enjoy the book.

Published: 25th July 2017Goodreads badge
Publisher:
 Tinder Press
Pages: 341
Format: Paperback
Genre: Children Classic
★   ★   ★   ★   ★  – 5 Stars

Mrs. Frisby, a widowed mouse with four small children, must move her family to their summer quarters immediately, or face almost certain death. But her youngest son, Timothy, lies ill with pneumonia and must not be moved. Fortunately, she encounters the rats of NIMH, an extraordinary breed of highly intelligent creatures, who come up with a brilliant solution to her dilemma.

This story is yet another example of “why, oh why have I not read this book sooner?” It makes you wonder if somewhere in this wide world there are rats out there doing as these rats do. It was a really great read and nothing was skipped over and everything was explained in great detail, especially concerning the rats themselves, which managed to leave nothing unanswered but still keep the story interesting and engaging.

Mrs Frisby is a great mother, regardless of being a mouse, certainly a fine example of just what a mother will do when her child and family are in trouble. And so modest too, truly a darling. What was great was how everything was described and explained from the mice and rats perspective, the settings and narration took you into their world and made you realise how much they pick up from their surroundings, both in the human world and from nature.

The ending left me wanting to know more because there is such a strong investment in their story when it ends you really want to know what happened afterwards. There is a sequel that wasn’t written by the author but hopefully that fills in where this leaves off, or even just addresses the final mystery, but even without that there is a concluding feel where you know things will happen and the plans that are put in place by the mice and the rats will come into fruition.

 

Top Five of 2018

I made a good decision last year to add all the books I thought worthy of my top five into a list as I finished them. It worked out well because I didn’t have to scramble and try and remember anything I had read or try to recall plot points and emotional responses come December. I ended the year with 5 books on that list, perfect, easy, ready to go and then there came an 11th hour addition on 31st December which made me rethink the entire thing and kick one of my books out. In the end, I think I chose the right books.

This year I have brought back the Honourable Mentions because a couple really do need mentioning. I have also started a Top Five Picture Books because they were remarkable as well and didn’t want to crowd my list. If I was really enthusiastic I might make it a top ten and just merge them together but that is a lot of pressure for next time. This way I can highlight some amazing picture books as well. Click the title to read my review.

 

A Thousand Perfect Notes by C. G. Drews

This was the first book I added to my list as soon as I finished it back in May. I patiently waited for this to publish and was not disappointed at how spectacular it was.

 

 

 

 

 

Ready Player One (#1) by Ernest Cline

I adored this book. If you love cleverness, video games and are forgiving about having the 80s shoved down your throat then you will love this. There is a sequel coming after the popularity of the movie. I’m not sure I agree but I am willing to give it a go.

 

 

 

The Seven Deaths of Evelyn Hardcastle by Stuart Turton

I could not put this book down. I listened to the audio and literally had it in my ears from dawn till dusk. It is amazing and so well planned out.

 

 

 

 

Loving Lakyn by Charlotte Reagan

Technically a prequel, technically a sequel but it can be read on its own. Either way, it is amazing and I fell hard and fast for these characters. The emotional journey I went on with these boys was incredible and heartbreaking. If I could read about them forever I would.

 

 

 

What If? by Randall Munroe

I had been reading this book on and off for weeks, piece by piece at night before I went to sleep. I finally finished it on NYE and something about it made me instantly decide to add it to my list. It was clever, funny, creative, fascinating. All of these wonderful things the entire time but it was upon finishing it I realised how much I genuinely loved this book. Therefore I had to bump another contender and rise this up the ranks.

 

 

Top Five Picture Books

A Hungry Lion or A Dwindling Assortment of Animals by Lucy Ruth Cummins

Eric the Postie by Matt Shanks

Naughty Kitty by Adam Stower

A Boy, a Bear, and a Balloon by Brittany Rubiano

What’s Up Top? by Marc Martin

 

Honourable Mentions

Soulless (#1) by Gail Carriger

Truly Devious (#1) by Maureen Johnson

Boys Will Be Boys by Clementine Ford

What the Fluffy Bunny Said to the Growly Bear by P. Crumble

Penguin Problems by Jory John

 

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