Nine Perfect Strangers by Liane Moriarty

Published: 18th September 2018 (print)/18th September 2018 (audio) Goodreads badge
Publisher:
 Pan Macmillan Australia/Bolinda Publishing
Pages: 464/19 hrs and 9 mins
Narrator: Caroline Lee
Format: Audiobook
Genre: Fiction
★ – 1 Stars

Could ten days at a health resort really change you forever? Nine perfect strangers are about to find out…

Nine people gather at a remote health resort. Some are here to lose weight, some are here to get a reboot on life, some are here for reasons they can’t even admit to themselves. Amidst all of the luxury and pampering, the mindfulness and meditation, they know these ten days might involve some real work. But none of them could imagine just how challenging the next ten days are going to be.

Frances Welty, the formerly best-selling romantic novelist, arrives at Tranquillum House nursing a bad back, a broken heart, and an exquisitely painful paper cut. She’s immediately intrigued by her fellow guests. Most of them don’t look to be in need of a health resort at all. But the person that intrigues her most is the strange and charismatic owner/director of Tranquillum House. Could this person really have the answers Frances didn’t even know she was seeking? Should Frances put aside her doubts and immerse herself in everything Tranquillum House has to offer – or should she run while she still can?

It’s not long before every guest at Tranquillum House is asking exactly the same question.

The LONGEST, most TEDIOUS 19 hours of MY LIFE. I swear somewhere around chapter thirty it never progressed no matter how many hours I listened to it. It felt like I was trapped in the thirties forever and with a book of eighty chapters this was a nightmare scenario. I am quite convinced time stopped because I listened to it almost every day and I never seemed to get anywhere. Just when I thought I think I’d listened to it for another 3 or 4 hours I was only one of two chapters ahead. In the end, I had to bring it in from the car and put it on the computer so I could get it to play at double speed. Even then it dragged on. It’s an amazing feat that a book this long could have nothing happen in it.

I am not convinced it was only the fault of the audio either. I have generally enjoyed Lee’s narration, she has done every single other Moriarty book I have listened to. But from the initial chapters I knew this one felt different. It was slower, much slower than her other ones, and I couldn’t understand her decision with some of the voices she chose for the characters. Francis is one of the main characters who gets most of the perspective and I could not stand her from the very beginning. I did not like her portrayal but retrospectively I appreciate her character. She was bubbly and naïve, she was idealistic and at least she felt like a real person. It’s just that from the start I was on the wrong foot with the narration and these characters and unfortunately it never managed to recover. For having a dozen key characters I felt that maybe only a few were really fleshed out. Even if some got fewer chapters for us to get to know them, I was still able to grasp who they were as people. Some of the others who had multiple chapters gave me so little I have no real idea who they are.

But I also didn’t care enough to care.

I did not care about their personal journeys and while Moriarty deserves credit for the variety of characters she has included, the execution was lacking.

I am trying not to just dump on this book, but after hour upon hour of waiting for something to happen I feel let down as a reader and I am disappointed because this isn’t the writing I have come to expect from Moriarty. With no plot except listening to these people and their boring lives I was desperate to grasp onto any real story at all. Where was the Moriarty’s Reveal™ that she is renowned for? Where was the intrigue and the suspense? How can such a diverse range of characters hold so little intrigue?

There is a moment that Moriarty breaks the fourth wall later in the book through Francis and not only does it read like she is venting her own frustrations at her career and the writing process, it jars the flow of the narrative and it took me out of the story because it doesn’t sit right. And to be honest, by that point I was using all my effort to keep myself in the narrative.

The ending was stranger and even more ridiculous than the rest of the book. I had heard the ending was amazing and while it might be the only time it got actually close to something happening, it still failed to hit the low bar I had placed on it after listening to the other 18 hours.

I understand from talking to other people that this is a book that divides people. They either love it or they thought it was boring and terrible. I know people in both categories and with my history of Moriarty books I went in with an open mind. It seems though that this book is yet another of Moriarty’s that didn’t quite hit the mark with me. There aren’t enjoyable moments, there are simply moments that aren’t terrible.

You can purchase Nine Perfect Strangers via the following

QBD | Booktopia | Book Depository

Dymocks | WorderyAngus and Robinson

 Fishpond | Amazon | Amazon Aust | Audible

The Guy, The Girl, The Artist and His Ex by Gabrielle Williams

Published: 1st April 2015Goodreads badge
Publisher:
  Allen & Unwin
Pages: 247
Format: Book 
Genre:
 Young Adult
★   ★   ★   ★  – 4 Stars

A rock chick.

An artist with attitude.

A girl with a past.

A party animal.

Four lives collide when one of the world’s most famous paintings is stolen. It’s a mystery that has the nation talking, but while Picasso’s Weeping Woman might be absent from the walls of the National Gallery, in other parts of Melbourne the controversial painting’s presence is being felt by Guy, Rafi, Luke and Penny for four very different reasons.

Life, love, art and one giant party intersect in this offbeat comedy about good intentions, unexpected consequences and the irresistible force of true love. 

I was pleasantly surprised by how much I liked this story. It was a great story already and Williams tells it in a way that engages you and intrigues you, especially with so many characters and their agendas to work around. It was a different story than the kind I had been reading and it definitely stood out.

Set in the 80s and based on true events, there is a great history woven into this narrative. It brings the story and characters to life as Williams puts us inside her character’s minds. I’m not sure whether it was because I knew this was based off true events, or whether Williams created such unique and fleshed out characters, but each of them felt real. We’re inside their heads, we see so many different points of view we get to know them all individually, not through the eyes of one character. I could picture them so easily, I was there with them, I understood their motives and I loved it. Different voices also contribute to the different points of view, Williams making them each stand out and distinctive.

I could not put this down once I had started, I was engaged and invested in these characters and even though it was history it felt like it could have been fictional. One thing I found clever was how Williams has overlapped events, the same moment through the eyes of different characters. It adds another layer of style and creativity, plus form a storytelling aspect gives you another point of view to the same moment.

The fact that you don’t know what is happening is good, and the fact you are trying to piece it all together is great, especially as you are unaware if there even is anything to understand.

The theft takes place in the 80s, but Williams has thankfully not shoved the 80s into our faces. Enough to set a place and a time but not overloaded so nostalgia and a need to remind people of the era takes away from the story.

I was impressed by the ending and I think Williams has wrapped up this story allowing the real events to play out, but also round out each of the characters we have come to know.

You can purchase The Guy, The Girl, The Artist and the Ex via the following

QBD | Booktopia | Book Depository

Angus and Robinson | Dymocks | Wordery

Fishpond | Amazon Aust | Amazon

Vera: A Tale of Pelythia by J. A. Knight

Published: 24th June 2018Goodreads badge
Publisher:
 Independently published
Pages: 54
Format: Book 
Genre:
 Fantasy
★   ★   ★   ★  – 4 Stars

The time has come for Vera to complete her Ceremony, a coming-of-age tradition of the mountain people of Torsti. To claim her place as an adult of her village, she must use her wits to survive a week of isolation in the wilderness of the mountain.

I was loaned a copy of this book and I was pleasantly surprised. This easily stands alone as a short story, there is impressive world building and character development and with a few lines and few words Knight can convey meaning and intent. I understood who Vera was, what she wanted to achieve and why, and I understood the villagers and their opinion.

This is also a wonderful introduction to a bigger, longer series if that’s where Knight is headed. There is space to grow and the events after Vera’s journey to unfold. The ending leaves you with questions and curiosity and while it’s impactful on its own, there’s a temptation to find the answers and further the story.

Vera’s a character who is young but isn’t looking for pity. Her own coming-of-age journey is one she ventures into with pride and determination. Her youth and naivety is evident but so is her strength and intellect. Knight brings her to life with her vulnerabilities, jealousy, and her insecurities that are relatable even for this fantasy world.

While I wasn’t expecting to hate it, I was impressed at how much I enjoyed reading this short story. I look forward to reading more about Vera and Pelythia if that is on the cards. Knight has the beginnings of a well thought out and creative world, not to mention strong and relatable characters like Vera.

You can purchase Vera: A Tale of Pelythia via the following

Amazon | Amazon Aust

AWW 2019 Challenge

Australian Women Writers Challenge Blog

January has arrived which means the Australia Women Writer’s Challenge has begun once more. I am feeling confident on my Aussie women this year, I’ve picked up a few new names last year so I have a great starting point to get going. If I start strong I can secure a good chunk and I learnt last year that reviewing can always come later, there’s no harm in reading in February and reviewing in December.

Based on my success last year I am starting my goal at Reading 30, Reviewing 20. From there I will either meet it or exceed it. If I hit it early I can always bump it up. I admire those who have their starting points at 50 or beyond. I think that would stress me out too much, I’d rather be pleasantly surprised when I exceed my original goal. Give myself a confidence booster.

If you want to take part in this challenge you can sign up via the website and you can set your own goals, higher or much lower than I’ve chosen. The challenge runs from 1st January to 31st December so there is plenty of time to complete your goal whatever number you pick, and you can sign up at any time during the year until the end of November.

AWW 2018 Wrap Up

It is the end of the year which means it’s time for a wrap up of my Australian Women Writers Challenge. After a brilliant start then a dry spell, I’ve come good just in time. One of these years I am going to sustain my streak of reading Aussie authors because even if I get a really good roll going until August, I then drop off again. I also keep forgetting to update my progress which is also why I start to fall behind because I don’t remind myself to do it and the numbers aren’t staring at me in the face telling me I’m behind.

But despite that happening, this year by some miracle I have managed to surpass my goal both in reading and reviewing! Some reviews are only on Goodreads right now because of my blog schedule and literally running out of days to post reviews this year, but I might do a sneaky work around and publish them early next year on the blog too.

This year I’ve read a great variety of books by amazing Aussie women including picture books, junior fiction, historical fiction, romance, short stories, and suspense. I tried a few new authors like Karly Lane who has always been on my list, and continued the back catalogue of others like Liane Moriarty and Zoe Foster. Another achievement was a lot of these books were published this year or last year. There’s a lot of satisfaction having actually read current books and not getting to them years after everyone else.

I’m thinking perhaps of upping my goal slightly for 2019, maybe sitting around the 30 mark. I think I can inspire/guilt myself into hitting the goal again.

If you are interested in signing up again or for the first time, the 2019 sign up page is live.

 

AWW18 BOOKS

The Inaugural Meeting of the Fairvale Ladies Book Club by Sophie Green – Review

Beauty in Thorns by Kate Forsyth – Review

Heart Beat by Belinda Williams

The Husband’s Secret by Liane Moriarty – Review

Three Wishes by Liane Moriarty – Review

Does My Head Look Big in This? by Randa Abdel-Fattah – Review

Obernewtyn by Isobelle Carmody – Review

A Thousand Perfect Notes by C.G Drews – Review

Chasing Odysseus by S. D. Gentill – Review

A Walk in the Bush by Gwyn Perkins – Review

The Great Rabbit Chase by Freya Blackwood

The Women in Black by Madeleine St John – Review

It’s Hard to Love a Tiger by Anna Pignataro – Review

I Don’t Believe in Dragons by Anna Walker – Review

I Just Ate My Friend by Heidi McKinnon – Review

Blood Secret by Jaye Ford

Heartstrings by Belinda Williams

If Wishes Were Horses by Karly Lane

Vera: A Tale of Pelythia – Review

The Younger Man by Zoe Foster – Review

Big Little Lies by Liane Moriarty – Review

The Internet is Like A Puddle by Shona Innes – Review

P is for Pearl by Eliza Henry-Jones – Review

Nose to Tail by Louise Harding – Review

Meet Alice by Davina Bell – Review

Alice and the Apple Blossom Fair by Davina Bell

Alice of Peppermint Grove by Davina Bell

Peacetime for Alice by Davina Bell

Truly Tan by Jen Storer

The Last Anniversary by Liane Moriarty – Review

Meet Rose by Sherryl Clark

Rose’s Challenge by Sherryl Clark

Rose in Bloom by Sherryl Clark

Rose on Wheels by Sherryl Clark

Force of Nature by Jane Harper – Review

That Feeling When by S. M. James – Review

The Great Garden Mystery by Renee Treml – Review

 

AWW18 TOTAL

Read: 37/25

Reviewed: 24/15

 

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