More Caps for Sale by Esphyr Slobodkina and Ann Marie Mulhearn Sayer

Published: 27th October 2015Goodreads badge
Publisher:
HarperCollins
Illustrator: Esphyr Slobodkina
Pages: 40
Format: Picture Book
★   ★   ★  – 3 Stars

Celebrate the 75th anniversary of the perennial favorite Caps for Sale with this never-before-published sequel to the beloved classic! In this first posthumous book from Esphyr Slobodkina, those mischievous monkeys are at it again, bringing laughs to a new generation of readers. The sequel, More Caps for Sale, picks up right where Caps for Sale left off, as the peddler comes face-to-face with those monkeys and their funny business yet again.

This sequel comes long after the publication of the first one in 1940 and is official in the sense that according to the authors note Slobodkina told Mulhearn Sayer to continue her work after her death and apparently they worked on this book together.

This story continues on immediately after the interaction with the monkeys in the first book as the peddler contemplates what occurred and how upset he is at not having sold any caps that day.

Once again the narrative uses repetition and mimicking in the monkeys actions and the peddler’s, and once again the peddler gets angry at the monkeys, somewhat incorrectly this time as they are less of a hindrance this time and more harmlessly mischievous.

The style of writing is similar to the first. The short sentences, the repetition as mentioned, and the basic story all feel like the original style Slobodkina wrote in. The illustrations are the same with the same basic but detailed style and if you combine the two together they could almost be the same story, a longer picture book with no deviation of story whatsoever.

The narrative asks questions to the reader which is engaging, just like the first story, and no doubt the antics of the monkeys will entertain kids. The monkeys have a larger role this time and do more than simply thievery in the first which is entertaining, especially given the peddler’s reaction and the impact that involvement has.

I don’t feel like the first book is ruined by this, it remains one of my favourite children’s books, but I do think it doesn’t hold the same standing. Whether that has to do with the additional author, the different era, or it was always going to be that way I don’t know. It’s a fun addition and with so many similarities it is still just as good as the original I think I’m always wary of posthumous sequels to famous books so long after the fact I probably go in unjustly sceptical before I start.

You can purchase More Caps for Sale via the following

QBD | Booktopia | Book Depository

Dymocks | Angus and Robinson

 Fishpond | Amazon | Amazon Aust

Caps for Sale by Esphyr Slobodkina

Published: 1st September 2015Goodreads badge
Publisher:
HarperCollins
Illustrator: Esphyr Slobodkina
Pages: 48
Format: Picture Book
★   ★   ★   ★  – 4 Stars

Caps for Sale is a timeless classic beloved by millions…one of the most popular picture books ever published! Children will delight in following the peddler’s efforts to outwit the monkeys and will ask to read it again and again. Caps for Sale is an excellent easy-to-read book that includes repetition, patterns, and colors, perfect for early readers. This tale of a peddler and a band of mischievous monkeys is filled with warmth, humor, and simplicity and also teaches children about problem and resolution.

I love old books that describe what the story is about in the subtitle so you know going in this is about caps and monkeys and monkey business but the story is delightful all the same. I’ve loved this story since I was a kid and it’s as fun now as it was then. There’s joy in seeing the peddler navigate the town with his caps, and his confrontation with the monkeys. Slobodkina’s writing is simple but amusing and it’s a nice adventure in the day of the peddler.

There’s repetition in the narrative and humorous gesturing in the illustrations when the peddler interacts with the monkeys and it’s great seeing even the simplest illustrations depict this gentleman stamping his foot in frustration at thieving monkeys.

The illustrations are simple but entertaining. The sight of the man with his numerous caps on his head is delightful and while the colours aren’t overly bold or bright the images reflect what is being described on the page.

The story isn’t overly complicated, nothing happens of consequence yet it’s cheeky and enjoyable to read and one kids could have fun with. I’m curious about the cover because at no point does he get in the tree, but it’s alluring at best if you want to give it a go.

You can purchase Caps for Sale via the following

QBD | Booktopia | Book Depository

Dymocks | Angus and Robinson

 Fishpond | Amazon | Amazon Aust