Long Lost Review: Paycheque by Fiona McCallum

Long Lost Reviews is a monthly meme created by Ally over at Ally’s Appraisals which is posted on the second Thursday of every month. The aim is to start tackling your review backlog. Whether it’s an in-depth analysis of how it affected your life, one sentence stating that you only remember the ending, or that you have no recollection of reading the book at all. 

Published: 1st April 2011 (print)/1st November 2012 (audio) Goodreads badge
Publisher:
 Mira/Bolinda Audio
Pages: 416/11 hours 4 minutes
Narrator: Jennifer Vuletic
Format: Audiobook
Genre: Romance
★  – 1 Star

Claire had almost forgotten her country roots. She is a city girl with an adoring husband, a chic townhouse and a high-flying corporate career. But when the police knock on her door one night with tragic news, her world is thrown into turmoil and she heads back to her family’s farm.

There, in the rugged beauty of the Adelaide Hills, Claire starts to rebuild her life with her friends, her father and his beloved racehorses, including a promising colt called Paycheque. But just as she starts to find happiness, and perhaps even love, she is faced with a life-changing decision… 

This probably doesn’t qualify for a long lost review because I couldn’t actually finish it. I listened to one and a half discs of the audiobook and gave in. I couldn’t get into the story, I thought the language was cliche and overly descriptive and flowery at times. I tried to imagine it as I was reading it whether it was the audio part I didn’t like, but I’ve been able to look past a bad narrator (and this one was tolerable) and I couldn’t get past the story. I try very hard not to give up on books so I feel bad about this but I couldn’t make myself keep going. Even after all this time I don’t feel compelled to try it again so I may have to give this one up as  abandoned.

It had an interesting enough premise, typical country born girl goes home and gets caught back up in the small town life she left. Even the promise of racehorses couldn’t keep me going, I don’t even think I got to the point where she actually goes back to the farm. I don’t think this will turn me off Fiona McCallum’s books, but it was the one that made me realise I don’t have to sit through boring books because there’s a lot more great things to read out there.

Long Lost Reviews: Harriet the Spy by Louise Fitzhugh

Long Lost Reviews is a monthly meme created by Ally over at Ally’s Appraisals which is posted on the second Thursday of every month. The aim is to start tackling your review backlog. Whether it’s an in-depth analysis of how it affected your life, one sentence stating that you only remember the ending, or that you have no recollection of reading the book at all. 

Published: 1st July 1996Goodreads badge
Publisher:
 HarperTrophy
Pages: 298
Format: Paperback
Genre: Junior Fiction
★   ★   ★   ★  – 4 Stars

Harriet M. Welsch is determined to grow up and be a famous author. In the meantime, she practices by following a regular spy route each day and writing down everything she sees in her secret notebook.

Then one morning, Harriet’s life is turned upside down. Her classmates find her spy notebook and read it out loud! Harriet’s in big trouble. The other sixth-graders are stealing her tomato sandwiches, forming a spy-catcher club, and writing notes of their own — all about Harriet!

I reread this book so many times as a kid. I had the movie tie-in cover which is now much loved as evidence by the very crinkled cover. I don’t remember a lot of the little details, but I have always had an affection for this book. This was probably reinforced by the movie, but to be honest, it was a great movie.

Harriet wants to be a writer, therefore she must practice. She writes down everything in her notebook, everything she sees and everything people say and do around her. I’d never thought about whether it was Harriet who subconsciously got me interested in becoming an author, I award that honour to John Marsden, but maybe she put a small seed in my head as well which started the idea growing.

Since I was a kid when I saw the movie and read the book, the movie has imprinted itself on me much more. The movie got me interested in The Walrus and the Carpenter poem, despite the fact I probably would have seen Alice in Wonderland first. I remember loving this book, and I definitely think I have blurred the movie and the book together in my imagination, but it was a great book to show what happens when you write about other people and put your opinions on paper in full detail.

I remember the book being a lot more serious than the blurb makes it sound like. As a kid I guess these things are more dire and I just remember the feeling I experienced when the others find Harriet’s notebook. The second hand mortification I felt stays with me now. It was the most intense and climactic thing I had read since being stressed about Bastian in The Never Ending Story.

Doing these Long Lost Reviews has made me reminisce about some wonderful books I know I’ve loved but have long forgotten. They also spark a strong desire to reread them, even when I can barely read the books I haven’t read yet. I may have to find some room though to revisit this little gem.

Long Lost Review: The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde

Long Lost Reviews is a monthly meme created by Ally over at Ally’s Appraisals which is posted on the second Thursday of every month. The aim is to start tackling your review backlog. Whether it’s an in-depth analysis of how it affected your life, one sentence stating that you only remember the ending, or that you have no recollection of reading the book at all. 

Published: 6th November 2008Goodreads badge
Publisher:
 Penguin Classics
Pages: 253
Format: Hardcover
Genre: Gothic Literature
★   ★   ★   ★  – 4 Stars

Enthralled by his own exquisite portrait, Dorian Gray exchanges his soul for eternal youth and beauty. Influenced by his friend Lord Henry Wotton, he is drawn into a corrupt double life, indulging his desires in secret while remaining a gentleman in the eyes of polite society. Only his portrait bears the traces of his decadence. 

The famous Dorian Gray. I always was intrigued by this story and was very pleased when I finally made myself sit down and read it. Now of course, can’t remember much about it. I remember being very confused for the first part of the book because it is written in the old style, wordy and lots of odd conversations and language, but I do remember enjoying the obvious sexual attraction between Basil Hallward and Lord Henry which was a delightful read.

For a classic piece of literature I didn’t hate it which was a surprise in itself, but I think I realised that the idea of this novel is much more enjoyable than the actual book itself. It’s very much a novel of its time; wordy and filled with gentlemen having strange conversations that all sound like sexual innuendo. Though this was Wilde, maybe it was actual sexual innuendo.

With a four star review I must have liked some parts of it, I think once it finally got going and the story took off it improved much more. I don’t remember much about what actually happens, I might even endeavour a revisit so as to reacquaint myself because I did always think I’d enjoy this book, and with four starts I obviously did, I just wish I could remember a bit more about it.

Coming Soon: Long Lost Reviews

Long Lost Reviews is a monthly meme created by Ally over at Ally’s Appraisals which will be posted on the second Thursday of every month.

Are you a blogger who keeps telling themselves you’ll get around to writing reviews, but then don’t? Do you write ‘review to come’ on Goodreads only to let them languish for years? Well then, the blog feature ‘Long Lost Reviews’ is for you.

The aim of the blog feature is to start tackling your review backlog. Whether it’s an in-depth analysis of how it affected your life, one sentence stating that you only remember the ending, or that you have no recollection of reading the book at all. Let’s tackle your review backlog and dig up some long lost reviews!

Starting next month I will be participating in a monthly meme created by Ally’s Appraisals. While I have been getting better at following through with my reviews, I still have so many let unfinished and unwritten. This is a great chance to go back through and review the things I read a long time ago. Even a quick glance at my Goodreads page tells me I have at least 35 books with a ‘Review to come’ attached to it and oh so very many more with nothing at all.

I am really looking forward to doing this because I think even though I have my Bookish Bites for the books I want to review but can’t seem to have much to say about them, this is a great chance to review the ones I’ve read so long ago I remember so little about them if anything at all. It will be a great challenge and I am excited to see what I have to say about these books that clearly I’ve read, and yet maybe remember nothing about!